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  • Technique and Training
  • Open Water

Swimming in a Straight Line

Most swimmers who train in the pool use both the lane lines and markings on the bottom of the pool to tell them whether or not they’re swimming in a straight line. With the visual feedback from these markers, swimmers can easily see when they n...

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  • Technique and Training
  • Open Water

Gimme a Break!

Everybody knows that rest and recovery are essential components of an effective training program. But have you ever thought about how to rest and recover during a workout, or even a race? You should—it will definitely help your training and rac...

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  • Technique and Training
  • Open Water

Drill for Thrills: Tarzan Drill

Swim and water polo coaches have long used the Tarzan drill to strengthen the trapezius muscles on the back of the neck and the back itself. McLarty points out that this is especially important for open water swimming, as the demands placed on the ne...

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  • Technique and Training
  • Open Water

Breathing and Buoyancy in Open Water Swimming

Most triathletes who come from running and cycling backgrounds are well acquainted with "sinking legs syndrome," an imbalance in body position during swimming. With more muscle mass in the legs, it's not surprising that it's a struggle to keep the fe...

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  • Technique and Training

Good Catch and Pull for Backstroke

The lateral upper-body line is an imaginary line running from elbow to elbow through the collarbones or clavicles when the arms are extended straight out to the sides. If it helps, think of making a ‘T’ with your arms and body. Our should...

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  • Technique and Training

The Habit of Perfection—Working the Walls

Excellence is not accidental. While we might be able to perform any particular movement properly during a focused drill, it takes tons of practice to ensure that those skills become so ingrained we’ll perform them flawlessly when the press...

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  • Technique and Training

Why Sculling Drills Matter

When sculling, you create high- and low-pressure areas by changing the pitch and shape of your hand. Much the way an airplane wing or a propeller works, the movement of water around your hand during sculling creates high pressure on the palm and low ...

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  • Technique and Training

Your Ideal Stroke Rate

Who doesn’t love that great warm-up mode—swimming nice, easy, happy laps in the comfort zone. This is good for the mind, body, and soul to be sure. But eventually, many swimmers want to see if they can go faster. For many, that’s wh...

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  • Technique and Training

How to Find the Sweet Spot in Swimming Efficiency

Your distance per stroke tells only part of the story in terms of your stroke.

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  • Technique and Training

Making the Most of Your Pull Sets

A pull buoy (or any equipment, for that matter) should always be thought of as a tool, not a crutch.